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between germany and russia by some measures is at its worst in decades. has there been a real break down between russia and the west as pew ten has come back into office? >> i don't believe there's been a break down. i think the perception of russia has been difficult from western investors. when you see human rights case come up, people get a bit more nervous. but general employeeliemployee russia is still a good place to invest. >> a lot of cross border deals. is the environment todayl emplo russia is still a good place to invest. >> a lot of cross border deals. is the environment todayemploye russia is still a good place to invest. >> a lot of cross border deals. is the environment todaymployee russia is still a good place to invest. >> a lot of cross border deals. is the environment todayployee a is still a good place to invest. >> a lot of cross border deals. is the environment todayloyee i is still a good place to invest. >> a lot of cross border deals. is the environment todayoyee i is still a good place to invest. >> a lot of cross border deals. is the environment todayyee i f st
to deescalate this conflict. the european union weighed in today as did russia. russia preparing a u.n. resolution calling for a cease fire. probably our closest ally abroad in matters of war and peace is britain, and they are taking the same line as president obama, although they are being even more direct about it. the foreign secretary saying that hamas bares responsibility for what's going on, but he warns that "a ground invasion of gaza would lose israel a lot of the international support they have in this situation." a ground invasion is more difficult for the international community to sympathize with or support. so the world, at least the world of the united states and our allies is pretty much speaking with one voice here. israel, stop the ground work thing. that's the message from the president. that's the message from allies. that's the message from the international community. that's the message from the europeans. that's the message from the egyptians. and even though our own president is traveling abroad in asia, that's the word from the mouth of our own president. ever
society, and you look at this map and you look at europe and russia. >> yes. europe is not just a debt crisis. we've been narcissistically focusing on a debt crisis. it's the western extrim city of the super continent and most changes in europe over the mill len ya have come from the east. they've come from the influx of peoples throughout the east. and we thought we had defeated that with the end of the cold war, that russia was out of it. but that's not the case. precisely because this belt of countries from estonia to bull gary are right next door to russia. russia will continue to be a factor in europe's evolution. if you look at russia, it's half the longitudes of the world but it's got less people than ban ga desh. it's been invaded by poles, electricity yanians, swedes. so russia still requires buffer zones in eastern europe and the caucuses. vladimir putin is not the totalitarian eastern giant the western union paints him as. his ne-yo imperialism is a function of his jeep geographical insecurity. poland, here in blue, may emerge as the real pivot state because, again, there's
won. that is the first myth. frankly, of russia won it. secondly common and and and and now we have the atomic bomb. new -- secondly, we have the atomic bomb. these are myths we explode, but what results is this believe we are always in the right, and it has gotten worse from generation to generation. tavis: if oliver is right and we engage in this self love, what makes you think that of bowdon -- a book that they are going to want to digest that? >> you do not think it is going to change the world? we just want to start a conversation. we think people in the united states have not studied their history. the national report card, most americans think the united states is sufficient -- is deficient in math and science. high school seniors are weakest in u.s. history, and the public in general knows very little u.s. history. tavis: what makes you think we are ready for that conversation now. >> the united states is in a transitional time. we cannot dictate all over the world. we are just in the process of losing two major wars. it is a terrible war. if the united states gets involved
] and in russia. 7% of the world's energy is here. -- 70% of the world's energy is here. briefly on human-rights, i do believe actually the great difference between democracy and dictatorship is simply this -- a soft assets, but an important one. and it does not have human- rights that i necessarily proud of, but india does have accountability. china can only become a modern nation if it permits democracy and if it permits secularism, that is equality and presence of trade. until then, it can be successful, but not monitored. >> i want to say three things quickly. i want to follow up on the admirals' comments. it is remarkable to many in the u.s. military that the u.s. is not ratified the convention. we had it pretty sincere effort to bring afford to the senate. we worked a couple of the votes short. i think senator mikulski for her support. i hope we will be allowed to take that up again and get that done as a country. it is challenging to make the case we're making, which is that these potential conflicts over territory should be resolved on the basis of principles when the final conven
countries like china and russia, along with our traditional allies and a number of other states across the world have stepped up to impose the sanctions together. and you saw in the intervention in libya. we're not only our traditional european allies but our arab friends also stepped in to intervene in their own backyard. that is not leading from behind. that is leading in a way that enables others to step up, share the burdens, and be part of the solution. i think that, you know, this president has adopted a very strong and smart approach to the american leadership using all of the instruments of our national power. the military, when we must, but also much stronger on diplomacy, economic instruments and so forth. when it comes to defense and defense spending, i think this is a big difference between the two campaigns. this president has put forward a very, you know, a defense budget that is strategic in that sense it is driven by strategy but it's also driven by the legal constraints of the law that has been put in place, the budget control act those passed by a bipartisan majority
. the syrian conflict. russia. this is 45 minutes. i thought i would start here. there has been a lot of conversation in this room about the transition and this country. this is happening in china. tell us a little bit about what you think this transition will bring. well of bring substantial change to china? stability or instability? >> it will bring both. let me explain. and we tend to look at transitions in the united states. people come in. they have to lie to keep orders. they have insurance. they were made to execute. this is not how transitions are working. the power is much less than that from the president of the united states. he has to govern with the consensus of the standing committee. we can judge what the problem is. he is the chairman of the board. he is the most powerful person. he had to form coalitions within the system. the manner of execution brought the country is not necessarily through the first task. each generation of leaders have reflected a certain experience that the revolutionary. they recognize that it had to be, it needed to be reformed. they have the a
killed at least 50 syrian troops. and the diplomatic front, russia says dialogue is the way to peace. >> we fully support the regional quartet initiative that has been launched to resolve the syrian crisis. >> that quartet comprises opponents of the regime. egypt and saudi arabia, as well as syrians ally, iran. calls for dialogue are in directly aimed at the syrian opposition which is meeting to search for greater unity. the national council and opponents within syria itself. hear, the groups under pressure from united states are seeking compromise. >> we will find a way to choose -- they will find a way to choose their leadership. in this case, the owhole world will be behind them. >> there are concerned about losing their influence. still, the hope to come to an agreement with other opposition groups by thursday. the goal, to form one body that would gain recognition in the international community. >> well, the former head of the aerospace is recommending that france used shock therapy to get out of its current economic crisis. >> his proposals include cutting 30 billion euros from
's re-election will have a positive impact on russia's ties with the united states. israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu has congratulated obama. in a statement he said he'll continue to work with the u.s. president to ensure interests vital for the security of israel's citizens. the two leaders are divided over how to deal with iran's nuclear ambitions. the u.s. is urging netanyahu not to take military action. palestinian president mahmoud abbas also released a statement saying he hopes obama will continue his efforts to achieve peace in the middle east. >>> the elite officials in charge of china are gathering in beijing to chart the country's future. the communist party is about to begin its transition of power. hu jintao and other leaders who have been at the top for a decade are stepping aside. and the next generation is taking over. the 18th congress of the chinese communist party starts thursday. the meeting happens every five years. delegates will approve new policies and appoint new party leaders for the five years to come. chinese authorities waited until the eve of
of the fact that in just two years british exports of goods to brazil are up 25%, up 40%, russia up 80%. last week we took steps towards a new defense partnership with united arab emirate that could be worth more than 6 billion pounds to british industry. i want us to go further still. when i look around the world, i see countries like germany using overseas business that works to drive new business. in brazil, for example, 1700 members of the german chamber. 1700 members of the u.s. chamber's. how many does the u.k. have? just 240. we need to do all whole lot better than that. i have asked steven green, our trade minister to work at home and overseas to increase the quantity and quality of services offered, could relate to the smaller companies seeking to establish themselves abroad for the first time. he will begin within 8 million pound pilot and 20 keep markets and go on to lead a transformation that will change the face of british trade overseas across the globe. there are valuable markets out there that just have not received the attention from government that they deserve. places like
's recovering from her injuries in britain. >>> the leaders of vietnam and russia have agreed to talk sea trade talks next year. russian prime minister and his counterpart announced the plan on wednesday in hanoi. economic and trade cooperation between the two countries has been steadily rising. medved said he hopes to get an increase in bilateral trade, that would bring total trade to about $7 billion in 2015. the two leaders also agreed to boost military cooperation. vietnam is engaged in territorial disputes with china in the south china sea. it's keen to bolster defenses amid china's growing maritime presence. >>> and that's going to do it for us this week. thanks for watching. we'll see you again next week on "asia 7 days."
but said he hopes the pe impact on russia's ties with the united states. israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu has congratulated obama. in a statement he said he'll continue to work with the u.s. president to ensure interests vital for the security of israel's citizens. the two are divided over how to deal with israel's. mahmoud abbas also released a statement saying he hopes obama will continue his efforts to achieve peace in the middle east. >>> the lead officials in charge of china are gathering in beijing to chart the country's future. the communist party is about to begin its transition of power. hu jintao and other leaders who had been at the top for a decade are stepping aside. the next generation is taking over. the 18th congress of the chinese communist party starts thursday. the meeting happens every five years. delegates will approve new policies and appoint new party leaders for the five years to come. chinese authorities waited until the eve of the congress to confirm details of this year's gathering. nhk world's michitaka yamaka in beijing has more. >> reporter: chinese
, the house had one bill on the agenda, the bill that would normalize u.s. trade relations with russia and that passed by a vote of 365-43. the senate has yet to take up their version of the measure. a capitol hill reporter fills in the details. >> sports of this bill normalizing trade relations with russia are saying it's long overdue and good for the nation's economy. why is that? >> well, it >> it will hopefully double exports to russia from the united states. it will go across a broad group of products. manufacturers are backing it strongly. it could be airplanes and parts associated with that. locomotives, chemicals, food, clothing. it seems russia likes u.s. products. we expect there to be good and quick growth. >> how is lining up to oppose it? >> it has wide support on capitol hill. even the administration backs the bill. it does seem to have broad support across washington and the country for businesses that want to export products to russia. >> with all of the legislation and that remains to be done in the lame-duck session, this is the first one. what are the prospects in th
the world war iii. host: let's go to russia. before the elections, president obama was heard on a hot microphone telling dmitry medvedev that he would have more flexibility after the election. what was he referring to? host: -- guest: romney is sent one of his sons to speak to one of the aids of vladimir putin. policy someone gets frozen during an election. russian policy, in particular. president who was prime minister during that time and now is president again. the relationship with russia has been somewhat fractious lately. secretary of state hillary clinton accused the russians of ridding their election. there were concerned for these popular protests in moscow where there was great oppression by the government and who lashed out at the united states as well. -- and putin lashed out. one of the earlier policies was for a russian reset, and attempted to take a relationship that was good at one. that had turned very fractious and taken from a basic transactional relationship, just dealing with things as they came out, to building a new, strategic relationship in russia. that has so
. the question was about to russia's role in asia pacific. russia was this year's host of apac. it will participate at the east asia summit. it is an important player in the asia-pacific region. both economically and diplomatically. it will continue to be so. >> regarding the president's trip to burma. human-rights leaders expressed concerns that this visit was too fast, too generous. their main concern here is that the administration is far leveraging the opportunity of the first presidential visit which can only be once to press for new reforms. has the administration been able to leverage this a budget -- visit for tangible foreign measures? would you like to be secretary of state? thank you. [laughter] >> thank you for those questions, josh. with respect to burma -- there have been remarkable progress. since we saw the president called them cookers of progress in the summer of 2011. you have seen the release of prisoners, you have seen the easing of the media restrictions, you have seen the infighting into the political process of the parties. we have consulted with stakeho
in all of these great events and really influencing american policy toward russia and having to worry about that, and yet at the same time he was concerned about my welfare and whether or not i was learning anything. c-span: there was a moment in the book you describe where you went to his house, and you were supposed to go to see him -- i think he was up on the third floor, and you caught him watching "the dick van dyke show." what was so unusual about that? >> guest: that was such a fantastic memory for me because nixon always claimed that he never watched television, and of course he did. he liked to watch the news. he watched sporting events. he used to watch football and baseball quite avidly. but he never admitted to watching sort of mindless entertainment. so i was usually about five minutes late for our meetings at the residence in the afternoon, so he normally expected me to be late. and this one day in particular i was five minutes early, and i was walking up the stairs, and before i could clear the stairs to the third floor, i heard the television going. and then i heard ca
in the countries, brazil, russia, india, bringing in europe, and do real nation building through economic means so you don't end up having a cold war with china or russia or entering a new gray war with al qaeda or intervention in syria or war with iran. let us hope those are not the foreign policy markers of a second term. he has a chance here. not for cold war with china, but to rebuild because china's going through terrible social instability, economic growth is plummeting. a whole series of issues to unit. >> it's worth mentioning the president announced the return of the u.s. to the tune of 170 million for projects over the next two years and that is something i'm sure the burmese welcome with open arms, but at the end of the day i think he probably could have gone with empty hands and still receive the reception he had which was people flooding the streets. reports of six and seven people deep on the sidewalks as his motorcade passed by. >> that's right. china has been offering a lot of cash, doing a lot of projects there. a lot of chinese business people in burma. china very much wants acce
earnings come true. russia is selling at six times next year's earnings. china and russia would be another if this broad picture that you're talking about. you want top own some emerging markets. master limited partnerships. high-grade bonds. >> are you worried about taxes going higher on dividends and cap gains in 2013? does that cut into the reason to buy stocks? >> i think many people say it has no effect. you can go from 15% to 43%. at the margin, that can influence people. this is why you want to basically find these company that have a defensive characteristic and where you are getting enough yield so when you lose the dividend, you have some income. corporations are buying cash. banks are buying liquidity. central banks are buying government bonds. foundations and endowments and pension funds are buying alternatives. individuals are buying bonds. rich individuals are buying jewelry, art, and trophy real estate. nobody is buying stocks in a big way right now. >> and yet morgan stanley for 2013 has come out with a more optist ism optimistic call for the s&p. what's the optimism? >> we
of this -- also the building of international coalitions. russia will be a big player. and on iran, what are our international allies, partners, the guys we do business with at the u.n. -- where is everyone else prepared to be before we go forward? host: on russia, this is the "wall street journal." the defeat was a relief in russia because mitt romney had called moscow the number one political foe of the u.s. it was added that mr. vladimir putin sent a telegram to mr. obama that the kremlin said was secret until the u.s. revealed the contents. dmitry medvedev posted a "congratulations" on twitter. so that was from russia. another foreign policy issue is china. here is the "new york times." warm words from china with a subtext of warning. robust relationships with china while maintaining traditional military ties with the u.s. we do not want to be forced to choose between beijing and washington but what is going on here? guest: it has to be looked at in the context of the campaign that just ended. china emerged as a symbol -- for romney, obama's regas overseas, his inability to stand up to this
coalitions. russia will be a big player. and on iran, what are our international allies, partners, the guys we do business with at the u.n. -- where is everyone else prepared to be before we go forward? host: on russia, this is the "wall street journal." the defeat was a relief in russia because mitt romney had called moscow the number one political foe of the u.s. it was added that mr. vladimir putin sent a telegram to mr. obama that the kremlin said was secret until the u.s. revealed the contents. dmitry medvedev posted a "congratulations" on twitter. so that was from russia. another foreign policy issue is china. here is the "new york times." warm words from china with a subtext of warning. robust relationships with china while maintaining traditional military ties with the u.s. we do not want to be forced to choose between beijing and washington but what is going on here? guest: it has to be looked at in the context of the campaign that just ended. china emerged as a symbol -- weaknessy, obama's overseas, his inability to stand up to this rising asian power. the united states and china
german soldiers in vast numbers were being sent to russia to die. when the germans vendorred and -- surrenders, the american propensity to save dear human lives while wasting cheap bullets and bombs reached its zenith with the dropping of the two atomic bombs. vir culley all -- virtually all of the relevant evidence, recent evidence from both american and japanese sources validates president harry truman's decision to drop both bombs. japanese leaders did not display the slightest acknowledgment of military reality illustrated i be a report of japan's top atomic scientist who was sent down to hiroshima the following day, and he had to report back to the emperor, and he was asked, was this an atomic bomb? yeah, it's an atomic bomb. then came the line, how long til we can make one? that's hardly the response of somebody looking for a way to surrender. truman intended to show japan that he would use any weapon at our disposal. there was no atomic diplomacy. he wanted to show the japanese that it was surrender or die. with japan's surrender came the temporary victory of the princ
to their estimates, will overtake saudi arabia and russia as the world's top oil producer by 02017. beneficiary by 2017. the i.e.a. chief economist told a news conference in london that he believed the united states would overtake russia as the biggest gas producer by a significant margin by 2015 and by 2017 would become the world's largest oil producer producer. will this prediction hold out? i don't know. but are we on our way towards significant gains in terms of our energy independence? yes, we are. the language in section 313, which this amendment proposes to strike -- i want to be very clear about this -- does not affect programs that have been discussed here in such areas as hydrogen fuel as a fuel of choice for engine design or doing away with r&d dollars. it is just not true. it states in part that this restriction goes to the cost of producing or purchasing alter national fuels if they exceed the cost of producing traditional fossil fuel that would be used for the same purpose -- that's very narrowly defined. there is a second paragraph in section 313 that goes to an exception to this
cost investments. ♪ >>> a couple other stories we're following this morning, russia's space agency has denied it lost communication with the international space station after a cable broke outside moscow. the story was first reported on state run news agency saying the broken kibl meant russia had lost the ability to control most of its civilian satellites. a spokesman was quick to assure that despite the broken cable, satellites and the station were continuing to operate normally. he also said the agency was able to communicate with the satellites and control them. plenty more coverage on this story at cnbc.com. further israeli strikes have killed three palestinians in the southern gaza strip this as three were killed in an auntment building in central israel, the first israeli fatalities since israel relaunched an offensive against gaza a day earlier. and the latest action came as the u.n. security council held an emergency meeting in new york to discuss the escalation of violence in the region. yesterday israel killed hamas' top military commander during air strikes. condemnation of
soldiers in vast numbers been sent to russia to die. when the germans surrendered in japanese are pushed back to their home islands, the american propensity to save dear human life are wasting cheap wallets and bombs reached at cnet with the dropping of the two atomic bombs. virtually all of the evidence -- recent evidence from american and japanese validates president kerry truman's decision to drop both bombs. japanese leaders did not display the slightest acknowledgment of military reality illustrated by the report of dr. machine. japan's top atomic scientist sent out to hear a shame that the following day and had to report back to the emperor and he was fast, was this an atomic bomb? then came the line, how long -- attended the response of some of the camp to surrender. truman intended to show japan that he would use any weapon at our disposal. there was no atomic diplomacy. he wanted to show the japanese study was surrender or die. when japan's surrender became the temporary picture of the principles of american exceptionalism worldwide. unlike all the previous empires commit the u.
the parties together. not just the united states. perhaps europe and russia. it's time that the israeli government and hamas and fatah all directly or indirectly have conversations. >> i want you to listen to this piece from jim clancy. >> this is a strategy -- the missiles are proving it's not going to work. they can go in again but it's not going to accomplish anything. it just puts us back there. >> putting the situation back to just where it was? >> where it was four years ago. >> he's talking about the israeli strategy. what do you think? >> he's a man who studied this very well. my opinion agrees with him that you're not going to eradicate hamas. hamas is part of the people there. and they're starving. a lot of them through embargoes and blockades. if you make peaceful revolution impossible, you might violent revolution inevitable. people are going to gravitate to the extremism and to military options only on both sides. you're losing the center on both sides. >> the obama administration was said to have been indifferent and that in some way escalated the situation or keeps propel
in space, astronaut sunita williams is back on earth. with after the astronauts from japan and russia, they arrived in kazakhstan. during the trip she broke the record for time of women walking in space. >>> vice president joe biden was in new jersey, visiting areas destroyed by superstorm sandy. he volunteered seaside heights, meeting first responders who lost their homes in the storm. he talked about his personal connection to the region and pledged long-term help. >>> during superstorm sandy, chris christie was firm about the importance of evacuating and unhappy with those who stayed in harm's way. christie stopped by saturday night live last night for a self parody for his hard nosed communication style. he dished out some hard jabs, including to those of us in the media. >> i do not thank any of the stupid mayors who ignored my evacuation rules, you're idiots. and when you ignore me, it makes you look like a real seth meyers. >> oh, come on. >> i'm speaking here. >> all right. >> i also do not want it thank the reporters that put themselves in danger. you no, by walking into the
into germany to sustain the war effort while german soldiers in vast numbers were being sent to russia to die. the germans surrendered in the japanese were pushed back to their home islands, and the american to save human lives while the statute votes and bombs reached its zenith with the dropping of the two atomic bombs. virtually all of the relevant evidence, recent evidence from american and japanese sources nowadays president harry truman's decision to drop those bombs. japanese leaders did not display the slightest acknowledgment of military reality illustrated by the report of dr. sheena. japan's top atomic scientist sent down to hear a shame of following day and had to report back to the emperor. he was asked, was this an atomic bomb? dan kim the line, how long until we can make money? is hardly the response of somebody looking for a way to surrender. truman intended to show japan that he would use any weapon at our disposal. there was no atomic diplomacy. he wanted to show the japanese it was surrender or die. became a temporary victory the principles of american exceptionalism worldw
, the stans, russia, china, all the countries that have interest in afghanistan. their calculus would be affected by our signing a bilateral agreement. >> so i think it is a very important answer. i have the same feeling. i think islamabad is the first capital that would be affected by the bilateral agreement. tying some elements of the pakistani government to terrorist groups. they are hedging their bets for what happens the day after we leave. if we're not leaving presumably, they lose that argument. but, you know, there is -- every situation is different. i can't help but relate this to iraq. nobody wanted our discussions with the iraqi government for a presence in iraq after our troops left to fail more than iran did. and in fact, they were working on that. the fact that it did fail and we have no continuing presence in iraq i think is part of the reason why iran's influences spread there and so incidentally has al qaeda re- emerged again. i think those are warnings to us about how important it is to do exactly what you have called for, which is to have a good -- much smaller but
. >> john: you grew up in russia. >> grew up in russia. didn't have the hostess. came here. >> john: you eat only healthy food. >> that's right. other russian flavors hostess doesn't make. so i've steered clear. and my understanding is nobody really -- i don't really understand, nobody still eats hostess as a practice of -- if we want baked goods we buy hostess. am i wrong? >> john: no one eats hostess caifntle. >> they do eat the coast es cakes but it is not seen as a delicious dessert. >> john: it is. twinkies have a shelf life of seven years because they have so many preservatives in them. i want to feed someone nothing but twinkies the last ten years of their life and see how long it takes their body to decompose when they die. between twinkies and ho hos which dick morris is a fan and chock codials, i don't know if they make those anymore but the cupcakes are still huge. hostess sells wonder bread so maybe you don't have kids -- >> don't have kids. >> john: children still love this crap. >> childre
diplomacy. this is something that really works. i try to expand it to russia, which i think is kind of a cool idea, but got shut down by the embassy. but at any rate, it's a great idea, needs to be bigger. used to be the chairman of the bbc. has been impossible mission -- and possible because this has to do two things at the same time that are very difficult to reconcile, although in my view it's an excellent job of records failing. number one, it is a tool of american foreign policy. number two, it is a real, journalistic institution that needs to abide by normal journalistic principles. so how can he do both of those the same time? well, it is hard especially if you have members of congress who don't understand what the law actually says. so i've actually come around to the view, which i never stated before and i kind of have resisted this for a long time. they really do think it needs to be much more -- needs to be brought into the broader foreign policy making apparatus of the united states government. otherwise i don't think it's going to survive. so i think that tension needs
korea, north korea, russia and japan all have leadership succession or elections during that year. it inevitably makes the top leaders focused inward on leadership issues, very unwilling to appear to be in any way weak abroad and so forth. 2013 is the opposite. you would expect the new leaders knowing they have to deal with each other for years to come potentially have a more positive agenda looking forward. how do we build something that's not going to impose high costs is and have few benefits? every one of those leaders has enormous domestic problems that they have to confront, and they want some more space to pursue that. so i think there's an underlying, you know, the kind of underlying tectonic plates are moving at a somewhat different direction in 2013. obviously, specific events can throw that out of whack, and if you look at the details, they're pretty tough. on xi personally, you know, he has evinced some, you know, he has some exposure to the u.s., he seems to enjoy being here when he's been here, he has good relations with vice president biden and so forth. he seems to
, you're going to turn to russia. i was living most of the past couple of years in the arabian gulf, in saudi arabia. if you're going to talk about iran, you're going to turn to china. if you go to latin america, you're going to turn to chavez, so we can have these debates about tactical changes in global perceptions, but still, at the macro level, if you're looking around the world at people who say "boy, if push comes to shove, let's see, putin, not so much. china, i don't think so. chavez, a little nutty, and he's going to die, anyway." tom gjelten: yeah. philip mudd: so, i think, you know, some of this is a micro conversation. jim zogby: but, but the issue, the question that was asked was our standing in the region and does it impact one way or another, and it does. and the reason why is because the leaders of that region, rightly so, turn to the united states, but the distance that grows between the leadership in the region and their people, over the relationship -- i was asked, actually, at the time when mubarak was being threatened by demonstrations, there was an npr reporter
is about $740 billion. the defense budget of every other major country on earth, including russia and china, combined, is $540 billion. you think we're all right? i don't know. i think so. if you really want to dig in, we said, how many contractors do you have? what do you do? oh, i'm a contractor with the defense department. or it might be the guy who makes something for 50 cents and sells it for $2. what's the range on contractors? it's between 1 million and 10 million. we'd like an audit. could we have an audit of who they are and what they do? i was a military guy. i was in for a couple years in germany. they have their own health care plan called military retirees. only 2.2 million of them. that's not a big cohort. many of them have never been in combat. they have their own health care plan. the premium is $540 a year with no copay. it takes care of all dependents. there are 61 department of defense schools still in america from wars long past to take care of dependents. they're right next to a bus ride for a public school. they all have a superintendent and principals and teachers and
and bring the parties together. not just the united states. perhaps europe and russia. it's time that the israeli government and hamas and fat fa all directly or indirectly have conversations. >> i want you to listen to this piece from jim clancy. >> this is a strategy -- the missiles are proving it's not going to work. they can go in again but it's not going to accomplish anything. it just puts us back there. >> putting the situation back to just where it was? >> where it was four years ago. >> he's talking about the israeli strategy. what do you think? >> he's a man who studied this very well. my lay opinion agrees with him that you're not going to eradicate hamas. hamas is part of the people there. and they're starving. a lot of them through embargoes and blockades. if you make peaceful revolution impossible, you might violent revolution inevitable. people are going to gravitate to the extremism and to military options only on both sides. you're losing the center on both sides. >> the obama administration was said to have been different and that in some way escalated the situa
promised to borrow a phrase as it relates to relationships with russia to reset the relationship with asia. part of this is an effort, yes, to contain the political, economic, and even military influence growing of china. that's not really a new story. there are geographic disputes, the islands in the south china s sea. we call them the spratly islands. a number of nations have a claim to those. the president is also breaking ground here. this is a commitment he made to attend the annual southeast asian nation summit. the president just finished the trip to thailand. he met with the king. he did some sightseeing. he had a press conference. we've already heard from him and his remark there is with regards to the situation in the middle east. he goes on to burma. that's the next stop looking forward. the president has got an little bit of criticism. you know, two years ago, a presidential drip to burma -- and this is the first sitting president to visit burma. two years ago it would have been unthinkable, not to mention the decades before that because of the oppressive regime there. the pres
to his world view, whether it's in the middle east, the cairo speech, about china, russia, things like that. this was another one, i think, in that line of speeches, people really want ed to understand th obama doctrine if they read all of these speeches together almost in a little book form they would get a better understanding of the president's world view. i would assume a lot of people already believe they have that understanding. he's off to cambodia and then it's back home because he has to pardon that turkey. i'll see you soon. >> thanks, chuck. even across the world in asia, the president can't escape washington. at a buddhist monastery he joked that geshgs 0s on the fiscal cliff may require a little help in the almighty. >> yes, we're working on this budget. we're going to need a lot of prayer. >> also on the president's plate a developing fight over who removed language and talking points given to susan rights that suggested al qaeda may have been behind the terrorist attack in libya? >> it went to the so-called deputy's committee that's populated by appointees from the admin
of russia initially when they went there to help the russian people, one of the first things they did with the help of the russians to two extreme poverty. my question is, is a risk too much for us so that we would a sickly state thank you and to let the door his shoe on the way out. >> obviously an indonesian case, part of that is just their farm are sensitive to questions of faith and we are so it's not infrequent we would behave in a way that doesn't take into account adequately their cultural sensitivities. this happens all the time and life. what's the right thing to do if someone isn't appreciative you didn't do anything wrong. don't worry about it and sometimes that happens. i wouldn't hesitate to help people unless someone related to the recipient weren't helped by their own kind. i would like to help. >> and i could add something to the indonesian case, there's a thing that exacerbated the relationship that made us were challenging for the ambassador. i'm sure we were still there when he was president wesley had a a policy decision here in the u.s. regarding the military enga
it to russia which i think is a cool idea. i got shutdown by the embassy. it is a great idea. in needs to be bigger. the bbg has an impossible to is as to do twoeared things at the same time that are very difficult to reconcile. in my view they have done an excellent job of reconciling its. number one, it is a tool of american foreign policy. it is a real journalistic institution. in need to abide by normal journalistic principles. talking to both of those things? it is hard for those who do not understand what the law actually says. i have, around to the view that the bbg needs to be brought into the broader foreign-policy making apparatus of the united states government. other was i just do not think it is going to survive. i think that attention needs to be resolved one way or another pie. the way it works now is that we used to sit down a summit people from our state wants are twice a year and see what is on your mind? i hope when i was under the secretary of there was more guidance. i think there needs to be. the second thing is that there needs to be a reorganization of the bbg.
by china, by russia, but others and look for them is one of the biggest is. well it's the u.s. not only national security secrets, the commercial seats as be of much of can be gleaned or stolen from cyberspace. it is a dire threat in part because we shifted so much attention, so much resource and the counterterrorism arena we've forgotten the necessity of old-fashioned counterintelligence and that's an important element of this. >> often i've heard some people involved in counterintelligence tends to be seen as the redheaded stepchild of the intelligence world. why is that when we need it and what is the cure for a? effect in part because it's something we don't want to think about. to think that our agencies and businesses have been penetrated by a foreign power, criminal organization and would rather think about how do we achieve that goal? a foreign-policy goal or profit objectives. but it's more fun. that is more positive and we are very positive nation. we can also be more disciplined about how we think of protecting our intellectual property and most of all our people. >> one of t
, potentially -- occasionally, and then russia. [laughter] and 70% of the world's energy is here. energy becomes so dray dramaticy contagious. what do you do? briefly over human rights. i do believe between democracy and dictatorship is this, a soft asset, but a very important one that why india does not record in human rights that, you know, necessarily be proud of, but they have accountability, and, therefore, i believe that whereas china could be a successful nation, it cannot be a modern nation, and it's only a modern nation if it permits democracy and if it permits secularism, the equality and presence of it. until then, it's successful, but not modern. >> james? >> three things very quickly. first, i want to just follow directly on the admiral's comments about the u.n. convention on the law of the sea. it is remarkable to many of the u.s. military that united states is not ratified the convention. we had a pretty sincere effort to bring it forward to the senate. we were a couple of votes short. i think senator my -- mikulski for the support. i think we can take that up again and get it don
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